Bonoboblogs

August 30, 2009
http://gamedesignreviews.com/scrapbook/quick-thoughts-on-magic-duels-of-the-planeswalkers/

Quick Thoughts on Magic: Duels of the Planeswalkers

Recently, I’ve spend some time on the new Magic: The Gathering port for X-Box Live Arcade. I have played Magic a couple of years ago for quite some time. I even organized a Magic tournament. I got out when I moved to Cologne due to lack of people to play with. By the way: the [...]


http://gamedesignscrapbook.blogspot.com/2009/08/this-blog-has-moved.html

This Blog has moved!

Greetings visitors! We from Game Design Reviews have decided to move our Blog from Blogger to our own, hosted Website. We enjoyed Blogger's service very much but we realized that this project has grown to a size were we wished for more direct control in order to provide you better service.

You can reach this very same Blog with all the post here:

http://www.gamedesignreviews.com/scrapbook/

If you are a recurring visitor, please update your bookmarks & rss feeds. We apologize for the inconvience.

August 27, 2009
http://www.floriankuhlmann.com/2009/fruhe-skulptural-experimente/

frühes skulpturales experiment

eben beim durchsuchen alter bilder wieder entdeckt. eine meiner ganz frühen skulpturen. leider hab ich sie wohl beim aufräumen oder saubermachen weggeworfen, schade eigentlich.
zum glück ist aber das wichtigste erhalten geblieben. ein bild.

bild213

bild213
(2004)


http://gamedesignreviews.com/scrapbook/welcome-to-the-new-and-improved-game-design-scrapbook/

Welcome to the new and improved Game Design Scrapbook

Hello Dear Readers! We, the Game Design Scrapbook Team have decided to move our Blog here. It is finally our very own webspace with our very Wordpress installation. It has taken us quite some time to do the jump, which is why you haven’t heard from us for so long. But now it seem like most changes [...]

August 18, 2009
http://www.bonoboblogs.org/imported/neuer-wii-trailer-fur-and-yet-it-moves/

Neuer Wii-Trailer für And Yet It Moves

Im Dezember letzten Jahres hatte ich kurz über die Demoversion von And Yet It Moves geschrieben. Mittlerweile ist das Indiegame für PC und Mac erhältlich; gerade mal zehn US-Dollar wollen die Entwickler aus Österreich für die Vollversion haben. Der Download kommt ohne DRM, Kopierschutz oder sonstige Nervigkeiten daher. Für die nun anstehende Wii-Variante des SpielsWeiterlesen…

August 13, 2009
http://www.nodepond.com/blog/26-new-media-gamedesignjobs-and-twitter

New Media: GameDesignJobs and Twitter

Two relevant things happened (beside all this promising work behind the curtain):

1. Nodepond is hosting gamedesignjobs.de: A (not to say the) German freelance- and jobboard for, well, game-design-jobs in Germany, Switzerland and Austria. Feel free to post your job today for free!

2. Not that new, but officially announced: Nodepond is twittering! Yes, it’s true. I have this account for a longer time now, but activated it today officially. twitter.com/nodepond.

Promising present and future:

1. I am working on some promising ideas, I’d love to share, if they reached about 80% of completion.

2. I’ll be at gamescom and gamescamp. Be there, too? Let’s meet then. Mail me or leave a comment!

3. My blog Digital Tools is about to reach the 1000 RSS-readers via Feedburner. I am about to make a very small event here in Cologne, if the point is reached. Be prepared and follow my the official DT / my private Twitter at twitter/020200 if you want to join.

August 10, 2009
http://digitaltools.node3000.com/blog/1569-boxgame-experimental-game-on-a-cube

Boxgame – Experimental game on a cube

boxgame

A clever and sometimes really confusing concept has the game “Boxgame“. The playfield is a three-dimensional box. If you jump over the “cliff”, than you fall on the other side of the cube. Imagine it a little bit like a mix of a platformer, a puzzle game and a Rubik’s-cube. The game was made by Sophie Houlden and is extremely playable. For me as a player I sometimes do not understand the 3d-dimensional connections with all this twisting and turning, but I can just go out and play. But the level-designer was having a real hard time, to test things our correctly, I guess.

You need the Unity-3D-player installed to play the game, but the installation is far away from being a pain, so just try it out. The other games from Sophie look also very interesting.

(via)


http://digitaltools.node3000.com/blog/1564-pixelprospector-indev-site-for-games-in-progress

Pixelprospector Indev: Blog and Archive for Games in Progress


A little “showreel” of indiegames in development.

Indev” is the name of an interesting project. It is some sort of blog or archive for promising indiegames, that are currently in development. It should be a place for interested people, that can pick up projects, where the like to follow the development process. I think that being on this list would eventually increase the chance of finding sponsors and / or publishers. Or audience in general.

The project emerged out of a thread at in the TIGSource-Forum (read more here), that grew bigger and bigger and finally into a own project now. Lingering is fun, because most of the games there feature at least screenshots and very great graphics.


http://digitaltools.node3000.com/blog/1557-flan-tile-map-game-flixel

Flan Tile Map Editor – Whacky Whacky – Game

Over at the Flixel-board good thing are happening ultra-fast and in a reliable quality. Flixel is only some weeks out (read interview with Adam who did Flixel), but the community flourishing.

One of the highlights is FLAN, a tile map editor especially made for Flixel. This tool is still in alpha-version, but also proceeding ultra fast. It is free for personal use, but if you use it professionally, it is available for a really nice price below 10 dollars (read about software-pricing here).

flan-feature-game-flixel

Nitram-Cero, who wrote Flan, made a neat micro-game to promote his effort and show off some features. It is a mini-narrative and feature some very lovely wacky motion of the player-character. Play it here.

August 6, 2009
http://digitaltools.node3000.com/research-and-theory/1554-appstore-and-software-pricing

AppStore and Software Pricing

AppStore, AppStore, AppStore… It seems to be one of the hottest topics at the moment. There is no day, where I do not read something about the AppStore. Is the iPhone / iPod the new CD-Player of the present: an almost must have to consume media?

Anyway, at coding horror I read something about the sensible area of “software pricing“. The layout of the AppStore has some special flaws, that set cheaper applications in advantage over “high priced” applications for, i.e. 9.99 dollar. They sell in masses and therefore dominate the “most downloaded” lists - an subtle effect. A bad thing? Not for Jeff Atwood, at Codinghorror. He writes: “the idea that software should be priced low enough to pass the average user’s “why not” threshold is a powerful one”. He argues, that lowering the price can have an tremendous effect, not only in the number of sales, but also in the total amount of money coming in. He gives an example and figures about Left 4 Dead. So better don’t leave now, without reading this article about software pricing.


http://digitaltools.node3000.com/blog/1552-hudson-shadow-tower-wii-physics

Hudson’s Shadow Tower and Shadow Physics

Late summer vibes. This means good weather and fresh ideas popping out of the heat. Like this one. Rumors go, that Hudson will release a Wii-game called “Shadow Tower”, that turns an stone old gaming-paradigm just the other way around. Objects throw shadows, and your aim is to use the shadow to cast the gaming character at home. With the help of a little butterfly, you can change the direction of light-source for managing special sections. So far, so good, now what?

At the Experimental Gameplay Sessions at the GDC 2009, Flashbang Studios presented a similar concept: turning the gameplay around, by using a gfx-by-product as a main source of play. Look at it here:

Anyway… Let’s turn around more gfx-by-products into main source of gameplay inspiration!

(via)(via)


http://digitaltools.node3000.com/blog/1548-star-wars-sound-using-a-slinky

Star Wars sounds using a Slinky

The sounddesign idea of the day comes from a “physics lecturer from the University of New South Wales in Sydney”. He shows us on this impressive video, how you can make really, really awesome Star-Wars-like sounds, well, with low-budget equipment. He uses a “Slinky” (one of the best toys ever invented), a mic and a plastic cup to kick to best out of it. (via)

August 4, 2009
http://digitaltools.node3000.com/research-and-theory/1533-history-of-cheats

History of Cheats

At Gamesradar I found an interesting article about the “History of Cheating in Games”. It may be written a little bit silly, but provides the basic facts of the - how they call it - “cheating industry”. For example:

Early in the history of videogames, cheating was really cheating. It was achieved by loading games into memory and modifying useful values before launching them. These memory hacks were called POKEs, named for the BASIC function used to overwrite memory. (…) The concept of intentionally created cheats also appeared early in the evolution of games, at about the point when cheats became necessary for testing. Without some sort of debug mode or life-extending cheat to make games easier, testing the absurdly difficult games of yore would have been absurdly difficult.

Yes, games were really much harder in the 8-bit era. But cheats survived them. With the rise of the game-pad the A, B, A, B, left, right, left, right - cheats appeared and slowly wandered into gaming culture. The latest offspring of cheats are “pay-per-cheat” in browser games for example, where people can decide to play the game and invest time to get achievements - or to take the short route and pay for a cheat. Well, with the intention of the game-designer of course, in order to monetize the game.


Not exactly a cheat, but its relative: the glitch. Seen on the NES.

Just keep on reading more about the phenomenon at Gamesradar.


http://digitaltools.node3000.com/research-and-theory/1533-history-of-cheats

History of Cheats

At Gamesradar I found an interesting article about the “History of Cheating in Games”. It may be written a little bit silly, but provides the basic facts of the - how they call it - “cheating industry”. For example:

Early in the history of videogames, cheating was really cheating. It was achieved by loading games into memory and modifying useful values before launching them. These memory hacks were called POKEs, named for the BASIC function used to overwrite memory. (…) The concept of intentionally created cheats also appeared early in the evolution of games, at about the point when cheats became necessary for testing. Without some sort of debug mode or life-extending cheat to make games easier, testing the absurdly difficult games of yore would have been absurdly difficult.

Yes, games were really much harder in the 8-bit era. But cheats survived them. With the rise of the game-pad the A, B, A, B, left, right, left, right - cheats appeared and slowly wandered into gaming culture. The latest offspring of cheats are “pay-per-cheat” in browser games for example, where people can decide to play the game and invest time to get achievements - or to take the short route and pay for a cheat. Well, with the intention of the game-designer of course, in order to monetize the game.


Not exactly a cheat, but its relative: the glitch. Seen on the NES.

Just keep on reading more about the phenomenon at Gamesradar.

..